click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
FBC 21
CNBC 20
CNNW 6
CNN 3
KGO (ABC) 2
MSNBCW 2
WBAL (NBC) 2
KPIX (CBS) 1
MSNBC 1
LANGUAGE
English 64
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 64 (some duplicates have been removed)
the sniffles so she will need another seven days of paid vacation. john: italy first. if you start a business and keep it small, up that 10 workers you have some flexibility but number 11 1/2 to have the self assessment outlying every possible health and safety hazard? >> yes. we're not just talking about heavy machinery but how you deal with specific stress with your age, gender, a doctor, the overwhelming majority of italian workers work with 10 or fewer employees. john: number 16 employee you have to have you representatives that is entitled to paid leave? >> eight hours per month. >> if you hire one more he must be disabled? >> number 16 the next one must be disabled or you pay the fine. john: 51st, 7% of payroll must be handicapped. >> 7% must qualify as disabled. rates of disability are pretty high. john: 101 employees, more rules. spain has reformed the stupid work rules that they no longer have to pay 42 months severance pay now it is just 24 months. that is still two years. >> if they turn out badly you will turn up and know them they show them two years. >> having 350,000 under seve
of what like goes on in italy and show you how much we are to european style. >> neil: and don't drag our people down. >> i'm telling you, neil, people who stay with their parents. a term for italy who does this and they do this. >> neil: you're out of money. >> unemployed, underemployed and get paid your welfare payments and party every night and it's kind of where we're going and think this is a direct correlation, and i think-- >> and you could have cited any other country on earth, but you had to go-- >> you know what. >> and you could have gone after france, but no, no, mother italy. charles, charles. >> firsthand experience. >> a lot of it points to a serious insecurity and you know, kids gone directly from college with the parents and sometimes may even have a job, but everyone is so intimidated by the economy o such a lack and i don't care what the polls say, people are worried about this, we have mcmahons reconfigured and i was going to sell my home, me and my wife and become a snow bird and that's not happening. it's rrisom i know a guy who is actually charging his parent rent.
. john: italy first. if you start a business and keep it small, up that 10 workers you have some flexibility but number 11 1/2 to have the self assessment outlying every possible health and safety hazard? >> yes. we're not just talking about heavy machinery but how you deal with specific stress with your age, gender, a doctor, the overwhelming majority of italian workers work with 10 or fewer employees. john: number 16 employee you have to have you representatives that is entitled to paid leave? >> eight hours per month. >> if you hire one more he must be disabled? >> number 16 the next one must be disabled or you pay the fine. john: 51st, 7% of payroll must be handicapped. >> 7% must qualify as disabled. rates of disability are pretty high. john: 101 employees, more rules. spain has reformed the stupid work rules that they no longer have to pay 42 months severance pay now it is just 24 months. that is still two years. >> if they turn out badly you will turn up and know them they show them two years. >> having 350,000 under severance pay but now just 200,000. why hire somebody to
. as for the action in europe, really, the action focuses on italy where there's an impending political regime change. more on that in just a moment. the road map starts at the golden arches. mcdonald's blowing out expectations for november sales after the dismal drop in the month of october. hoping to fuel the rise, the bacon/onion/cheddar sandwich. >> there's one thing for certain, taxes on top earners are going up. >> turmoil in italy. berlusconi throws his hat in the ring. retail sales numbers out of china, hoping the economy is in fact on an upswing. >> apple, enthusiasm. jeffreys trimming its price target to 800 from 900, as apple shares do trade lower in the pre-market. we'll start with mcdonald's, posting better than expected november same-store sales, global comps up 2.4. u.s. same-store sales up 2.5, offered by breakfast offerings, including that cheddar/bacon/onion sandwich, as melissa mentioned. jim? people are saying the u.s. maybe is making a turn here. >> i find mcdonald's is levered to new products, levered to menu technology. they do invent things. my hat's off to janet. they had thi
there of in europe. mario monti is stepping down as prime minister of italy. he lost support of the people. he was out in front of italy's debt crisis last year and he lowered the bar in cost. he is a smart guy. he obviously does not want to stay there. investors took heart from the latest data out of china. growth is accelerating. no more that owning our process here. almost 10%. beating analyst estimates. copper moved higher. it is an industrial metal. money flowing into stocks. minors like numa mining. then, of course, the announcement that they would be taking a big acquisition. today, it is up more than a percent. cliff natural of about 5%. we should not forget mcdonald's. better same-store sales than expected. coming up in just a few minutes. cash is king at ethan allen peered the furniture retailer throwing a lot more cash at shareholders. they are announcing a one-time payout this month alone. we will get the inside story from ethan allen chairman and ceo farooq kathwari. you have to hear about his plans for china. international expansion is a huge priority. the chinese may like that p
seeing signs of stress again with the concerns about leadership in italy, and problems in greece, and should we pay attention to that than the fiscal cliff discussions? >> well, you know, right now, doesn't seem like the market is paying attention to that right now. it reminds me a lot of september, before the election, when the s&p's rallied. everything was con taped. we were worried about central bank, liquidity, numbers okayed here, heating up in china. people thought europe was contained, and it feels that way now. people looking past the headlines whether it's the fiscal cliff or europe. i mean, there's a lot of doom day sayers out there, and it makes sense, but it seems like everything right now is contained, and the trade is up to the upside. david: right. liz mentioned the fed decision coming up, should be hearing about it tomorrow. what's the market expecting from the fed? in what way will they be excited or disappointed? >> well, i think the market, if you look at the options market, the flows into the ten year treasuries, it's implying 85 billion per month. the reason
instead of putting on taxes. >>> france, italy, the united kingdom, even greece is raising its tax rates and it's not helping at all. growth rate is very low. thank you. bugging your bus with your own tax dollars. government says it's eefgs dropping for your own safety, folks, but it is just a costly invasion of your privacy? >>> nothing private anymore. san francisco the latest city putting eavesdropping devices on public buses. department homeland security dishing out $6 million to the city by the bay so it can listen into the passengers and more towns are planning to do the same thing. and john hates the idea. why? >> its horrifying blast to the iron curtain world of the past where brutal governments snoop on people. we're not subjects of the federal government. they work for us. the idea they become angels so they can look over us is really scary thing. >> it's the worst of the past. big brother era and worst of the future with high technology. what do you think? >> please. come on. a lot of crime happens on buses. i think it's a great idea we have cameras in there. it's not like som
and that is a game leapfrog. we end up with more debt and a weaker economy. the road map is greece, italy, spain, all over europe but the president thinks you can tax-and-spend your way to prosperity. >>neil: what the administration throws back on the issue is take a look at italy and greece, austerity has worked. you say what? >>guest: they have a strange definition. alwaysst either to them means higher taxes in europe and the united states austerity means less spending. i am in favor of the right definition of austerity. the balkan countries got out of the mess and now they are doing well economically because they cut, not just cut spending in the washington sense of increasing it at a slower rate they spent less one year after the other and now they are out of the trouble. if you understand the right definition of austerity is the way to go, the problem is in most of europe it means higher taxes, obama wants to give us the bad part of europe, without the good part. >>neil: thank you very much. they are not cutting anything. just slowing the growth. rebound and former president bill clinton hitting
. the question is what going to become o of the circus known as the political situation in italy but really we do think futures will trade higher again. liz: thank you, john, good to see you. david: shares of diamond foods following double-digit lead. nicole petallides with details as to why. nicole: you think of diamond foods you think of the peanuts and the top-secret popcorn. it really is a household name they came up with numbers in the fourth quarter loss, not good news. that is why the stock was tanking today. all kinds of charges they had according to an accounting scandal investigation, that actually hit their numbers as well. this is why diamond foods was coming under some significant pressure today. back to you. david: president obama visiting a michigan auto plants today discussed in a fiscal crisis. our next guest argues in the long run they could see strong auto sales if ther there's no d% all. joining us now, edmunds.com chief economist. good to see you. how would we be better off if we go for the fiscal cliff at least in auto sales? @> we're better off because we're taking hard med
? not italy, i can tell you that. one global investor shares his pick next. tracy: the food and the love is still better there. a look at the winners and losers on the nasdaq. as we head out to break, research in motion up top. liberty media holders and sears all down today. we will be right back. tracy: so here's a shocker, not only as a federal government spending way more money than it has, but state government spending is also out of control. so much so that had to hold a conference to figure that out. senior washington correspondent peter barnes has the latest. let's get all these people together, spend more money to figure out where overspending. >> it was an interesting conference. many state governments have also made big spending commitments they may not be able to keep and display experts at the u.s. chamber of commerce said it could be getting worse. this report from that task for force, the state budget crisis task force estimated state and local tension funds are underfunded by 8 trillion to 3 trillion. another trillion for unfunded health benefits and other health care refo
's happening with italian politics. of course, mario monti saying he was going to resign as italy's prime minister. that paves the way for flesh elections to be called in the beginning of next year. yesterday, we saw the negative reaction. sylvia berlusconi wants to make his return on the political scene. today, we saw a bounce back. if you can see see bind me, the bank stocks in italy rerebound, but it's only in the range of .5% to 1% of these names which were down in some cases nearly 10% yesterday. if you take a quick look at european bourses, if that's possible, down near the ftse mib, this is the one selling off somewhere in the range of 3.5% yesterday. today it's adding about .8%. in spain, showing a nice rebound. same attitude listing peripheral debt. we can take a look there. italy and spain seeing prices rise, yields falling to 4.75% and 5.75% respectively. is investor attention returning to spain? here is the thing. italy is the third biggest government debt market in the world. it's the third biggest economy in the eurozone. whatever happens with its political situation could p
was supposed to come to market. italy, oh, my, what happens when italy -- it turns out you had to take it down. i know that john corzine, very controversial figure. that's a code word. but what a trade they almost had. in the news again today. >> almost. >> horseshoes, hand grenades. >> we should point out, gm was certainly not having the easiest of times of it. this morning's stock is up sharply, we're telling you why. the company will buy back at a premium to at least what was the market price as of yesterday, 200 million shares from the government at $27.50. that having the effect of sending the stock above that. why not, if you're gm, you've got all this cash sitting on your balance sheet. you're earning virtually nothing on it, why not take the opportunity, even at a premium, to buy it back by as much as 11%, shrinking the cap by that much. we heard from tim massad who runs t.a.r.p., they'll be dribbling out the shares over time. the next 12 to 15 months. similar to the strategy employed with citi. a bit of it coming out. and finally they cleaned it up with a few big blocks. >> that was v
because spending cuts are not working out for italy's government. prime minister mario monti announced he would resign after losing support over his austerity moves. a return of political instability there reminds us that europe still faces a lot of hurdles before it comes out of its economic crisis. countries like greece, spain and italy have been tackling their problems with sharp cuts in spending and higher taxes and that's been fueling recession and unrest. meanwhile, we now know that japan officially slipped into its own recession over the summer with the japanese economy contracting 3.5% between july and september. now, the previous quarter, the previous three months number was also revised lower and that makes for two consecutive quarters of negative growth and that's the classic definition of a recession. from asia, back to america, literally, a group of chinese investors agreed today to buy an 80% stake in aig's aircraft leasing business. back in 2008, the insurance giant was bailed out by the u.s. government to the tune of $180 billion. four years on, still paying back the money
of headwind from overseas, political shakeup in italy and sharply slowing down chinese export growth, keeping u.s. traders on edge not to mention the vagaries of the fiscal cliff. markets move with progress or lack of progress as the case may be. the congressional budget office says we could be back in recession the first half of next year if a deal is not reached. those are things they're watching. >> mandy drury at the new york stock exchange, thanks. >>> someone sign this kid up. this is christian balkner, giving the tampa bay buccaneers cheerleaders a run for their money. check him out. ♪ >> he is good. they call christian little steer, named after the mascot captain steer. in case you're wondering, yes, he can definitely teach you how to dougie. he is good. >> who are you talking about? oh, there was a little boy there also? >> nice, matt. >> when you said check this out, these guys -- >> in about eight years, that kid will be not be -- >> turning around a lot. >> al roker has your forecast. al? >> thank you so much. we've been talking about this system. first of all, it dumped a ton o
, guess, take a guess. it is a greece. tracy: i was going to say italy. i really was. ashley: they're not far behind. annual corruption index says all the countries embroiled in financial crisis top the list in europe, spain, portugal, yes, operationsy, italy. it measures the perception of the corruption in the public sector. as the most corrupt nations in the world. here we go. afghanistan, north korea, and somalia top the list. on the other side of the spectrum, countries with least perceived corruption, denmark, fin left-hand and new zealand. where does the u.s. rank? 19th. tracy: nobody lives in those countries. ashley: what they do is very simple and very clean. tracy: very blond. ashley: very blond. definitely in denmark and finland, that's for sure. tracy: the dark skin, the dark eyes. we're all evil at heart. ashley: that is the quote of the day. thanks, tracy. i didn't say that. tracy: all right. quarter after. come on. right? think about it. as we do every 15 minutes we check on the markets, nicole petallides on the floor of the new york stock exchange. from the most corr
with italy up by about .2 of 1%. >> we'll do our best to keep focused on the business day. we'll be following the tragic shooting in connecticut, of course. the new york stock exchange will hold a moment of silence to honor the victims in the next few moments, and we'll be looking at the president's call for meaningful action and the politics of gun control. >> let's get to a road map for this morning. it starts with apple. under pressure once again. even dipping below $500 a share at some point this morning. shares will remain range bound near term. iphone 5 sales and cannibalization among the region. >> other concessions from the gop, the speaker proposing tax hikes for millionaires. could this be the tipping point. moving the talks beyond deadlock. >> a big week for earnings. yes, earnings. fedex, research in motion among the companies reporting. so finally maybe we'll be talking about fundamentals in the stock market more than just the cliff. we've got to talk about apple reversing its move lower this morning, sold more than 2 million iphone 5s in china. the best debut for any iphone in t
and italy. the boreses and footy 100, the xetra dax, this has been the outperformer up in the range of 30%. another .3% after the ifo out of germany. came in better than expected. again, a good sign for growth. not necessarily, though, for those who would like to see a weaker europe. the ibex 35 adding 1.3%. and the nikkei, as you mentioned, up above 10,000 for the first time in eight months. adding 2.4%. better hope the moves in the japanese government or bank of japan pan out. we'll get the bank of japan's decision tomorrow. but this comes on the day when, remember, it's on the weakening of the yen which we can show you on hopes that that will help the japanese corporate sector. remember, we saw export figures showing a drop of 20% in exports to the use. 15% to china. again, there's a lot of expectation built to this. the aussie/dollar remains the underperformer as we continue to evaluate china's internal rebalancing. now the sterling is stronger, the dollar/yen you already mentioned. and the euro/dollar to get back to the point about the ifo survey is adding .3% to 132.-- 1.3274. we ge
that conviction and says he is considering running again for prime minister of italy. the syrian regime can and will deploy chemical weapons on its own people unless other nations step in. that's the word now from a former syrian general who now leads the rebels. plus, investigators say this beauty queen died after a shootout in mexico and they have now linked one gun at the scene to the failed operation fast and furious. plus, the latest winter storm could throw a huge wrench into travel plans across several states. we'll tell you where it is headed and how much it's about to dump as we approach the bottom of the hour and the top of the news as fox reports live tonight. and 320 calories. marie callender's. it's time to savor. what starts with adding a friend... ♪ ...could end with adding a close friend. the lexus december to remember sales event is on. this is the pursuit of perfection. the lexus december to remember sales event is on. hey, yo, check out this chef, right? right? that's so gay. that's really gay. dude, look at those pants. please don't say that. what? don't say that somet
comes up over the year. liz: worried about greece and ireland and portugal, and italy, spain, then the election. go back to the primaries. what will happen with the primaries, then election, then fiscal cliff. it's always something. all you really saw if you look at one are to your charts of the s&p, dow, you name it. not exactly a straight shot, but it was a rally. people sitting on the sidelines terrified, shaking their hands saying we are not going to buy. look at the far left. now where we are today, you're looking at what some of you out there miss because you were scared. how did you convince people there is more room to run normally you don't believe that? >> for us it is very much business. with respect to these various crises are fears of the fiscal cliff for the election are what have you that the rate -- create uncertainties in investors' minds, it's often better to adjust to now. ridge example is the election. in early november right after words two weeks later, 11%, markets is just grew up. be classy about this. event guess what. yesterday or the day before we we
another in the wrong direction. at the end of that journey the destination is greece or spain or italy. melissa: right. >> we have to figure out how to get control of intitlements. the while house refuses to have adult conversation about that. melissa: neither of these proposals, neither side gets us closer to closing the enormous gap you're talking about. i say over and over again and if this was your household and bills were so far out of line with what the revenue was you could get very serious very quickly. these people do not seem to do that. for republicans is it looking more and more palatable to go over the cliff at this point? >> depends on how dogmatic obama is. like selling a car on craig's list and put it up for 5,000 and really take 4500. someone offers you 4,000. this is classic negotiating. we have to be serious. this isn't just a game. we're not playing poker on a thursday night. if we don't get fix our fiscal problem, by the way to give republicans credit, i just don't want to attack them, they passed the ryan budget earlier this year and last year and that actually do
back as we're talking, rallied back quite a bit in the ten-year bond futures in italy but you know what, politics aside, mario draghi bought himself and europe some time. i don't know what they'll do with it, it will be 2013's story. >> you nailed it, to me every strategy since the crisis hit in this country in my opinion you could call it kick the can but it's about we have no idea what the effects are going to be, what the exit will be or if any of this is going to work but trying to buy time for something to happen. that something has to be growth and i still don't see how europe has a plan for more growth. >> we know greece is done with because they've already restructured their debt and what they did in the last two weeks, which the germans said they should do, they should have done three years ago they'd be better off. spain is the immediate problem, you have 26% unemployment which is non-performing loans. >> we have to go, 2,200 pages of health care, i'm sure the notes spain's taken how greece has got money at every turn, their pile is a bigger pile than the health care plan. >>
. >> the european markets are closing now. >> remember yesterday and all that concern we had about where italy might go with the resignation of mario monti. greece is higher. por sh gal is higher. spain is higher. it's a good day for -- investor sentiment.strongly it was revealed today. optimism over what the fed is going to do in the united states tomorrow. optimism there will be a deal on the fiscal cliff. you have optimism that the recapitalization of the banks is going to be delayed by another year according to the bank of italy. and you have optimism as well on mar of election promises as we now face the pros wekt of a much earlier election in italy. to that end it is fascinating. sylvia berlusconi has come out today warning about the germano center of politics. in other words, too much of a focus on what is happening from germany and the austerity inspired by angela merkel. in particular, he is drawing attention to this. which is the spread of the extra that investors demand to hold italian bonds over german bonds. i've shown this to you a couple times. over the last year it's been a mainstay
of comments about what happens happening in europe and the need to liberalize the taxi systems in italy and so forth. are you comfortable with the system you have now in new york? i understand the medallion changes hands for $800,000. so you have a few people who control a lot of these licenses. who are creaming off most of the profits. then you have often first generation immigrants who are tearing around on the street 12-hour days trying to make a living? is that fair? >> medallion now trades for $1 million. so i think that does prove your point in a sense. look, we are -- the biggest issue in new york city is outside the core service area in midtown, downtown manhattan. mayor bloomberg has gotten legislation out to let us create a whole separate class of taxis that will operate in the boroughs. we do need more cabs. that $1 million price -- >> did it get approved? >> the governor signed it, the taxi owners, they have a lot at stake. they've sued and it's in court now. we're going to get a final decision by may or june. i'm sure we're going to win and put the new meltions on the street. >> d
for actions he took in italy in 1945 as a member of the legendary 442 combat team composed entirely of japanese americans. may senator inouye rest in peace. >>> now back to some stock market work. stocks continue to discount a fiscal cliff solution of some kind. as i've suggested, they're reacting positively. how about a little optimism on that story? up next, some optimism. ...so as you can see, geico's customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real. geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this computer-animated coffee tastes dreadful. geico. 15 minutes could save you 15 % or more on car insurance. someone get me a latte will ya, please? come pre-filled with problems. enough is enough. introducing the chase liquid reloadable card. with chase liquid, there's no waiting and no fee to activate you can load cash and checks at any chase depositfriendly atm and there are no withdrawal fees at ov
china and europe it was on a year ago that italy and greece would be following in disaster. of course, they subsequently turned out to be the single best places to invest for fixed income in the world. not only did the sky not fall, but you had to do some serious buying to keep up with the others around the world. that's still the case. we have been buying an etf for my travel trust. was there a more uniform agreement than the idea that the euro had to die and the weaker countries were going into a depression? i think they'll have slow growth for years. we know a ton of countries that could do very well in a low-growth environment. a year ago all the wise guys were telling us to avoid china because it was a house of cards. the course only grew more uniform through the summer and fall with the chinese market falling to multiyear lows. but in the last few weeks, china's economy bottomed during the summer as they were focused way too much on beating inflation. now it's become the best performer in the world, and i don't think you've missed the move which is why my trust has been buying a
against a nest of machine gunners that were perched on a ridge in italy. during that attack, he had his right arm shattered by german gunfire. he still managed to destroy the german encampment by snatching a grenade from that destroyed arm and throwing the grenade toward the enemy position taking it out and earning himself in the process the medal of honor. dan inhoye became the second longest serving senator in u.s. history, and at the time of his death he was third in the lane of succession behind the vice president and the speaker of the house. senator daniel inouye's office said he died of respiratory complications. he was 88 years old. >>> second item you should know about in today's news, outside of the news from newtown, connecticut, is what seems like the inevitability now that the next united states secretary of state is going to be massachusetts democratic senator john kerry. nbc news has been able to confirm that senator kerry will be nominated for that job by president obama likely sometime this week. senator kerry is not expected to face significant opposition in the senate
support of spain and italy if they sign to oversight and japan talking about printing money until they get a 2% inflation rate, every central bank in the world defect of the lowering interest rates or expanding balance sheets so everybody is flooding the global market with liquidity and in that environment you want assets that can scale their cash flow to the decline in value of the currency, equity, real-estate, not fixed income, tragically that is where investors are putting their money. ashley: what happens when they take the punch bowl away and if that happens all the sudden? the fed says it will signal clearly but that has got to be a concern. >> i have a feeling that ben bernanke has dusted off the fed's post world war ii playbook. people think we are in unprecedented policy environment we are not. we were deeply indebted after world war ii and the fed cut interest rates to zero and could compare for 14 years. every time the ten year treasury popped above 2 bling 5% they printed money and bought the ten year treasury for 14 years. the result of that was slowly over time we rode away
in their economy, if not a recession. >> yes. you can see it in italy. you can see it in japan. the reason for that is that the number of workers supporting the proportionate number of retirees to ross over time. there simply is not as much money being kicked into a system. stuart: japan has a far bigger debt than any european country and far bigger than the united states. i think that is true as a proportion of the gdp. >> when you add all the debt to gather, the figure is far higher. in fact, it is closer to 500% of gdp. stuart: hold on, let's get back to america. we have a lower birthrate. the loss in american history. but don't we also have mass immigration, which makes up, i think, for a lower birthrate. our population still experience. we are nowhere near the japan issue, really. >> this is the beginning of another step that reinforces the fact that we are headed down the same path. japan has had eight failed fiscal stimulus programs. we have had three or four, depending on how you count them. at what point, do we stop in washington and say we may have a fundamental problem here. the
haven't been, italy. >> and over to the bikini shots. >> we'll be back for "gma live!" this is by a great photographer, jacques folay. you see the gondolas parked there. you couldn't see this when we were picking our favorites and not think of our dear, dear robin roberts, who is thankfully going to be taking us all back to venice with her when she gets back here to "gma." >> a special broadcast. >> you want to see this. also, a personal favorite. it's "get the led out." a beautiful, detailed history, for me, it was my band. >> really? >> this is my band. yeah. many firsts to the song you're hearing right now, "stairway to heaven." >> hmm. >> leave that on the table. >> high school slow dance song. and kennedy center honor for lifetime achievement in the arts. being given to one of the great bands of all-time. >> cars. i love cars. you can buy this book or pay the mortgage. this is the most expensive book i've seen in my life. it's $695. >> you can buy a car for that. >> if you've got it like that -- you can buy a car. the book is. it doesn't come with a car. but look
ready with unlimited support for spain and italy, when and if they sign on to oversight agreements. these are huge dramatic changes. think about how many times we've agonized over where the money would come from for bailing out spain and italy. now we know. when they sign on to oversight. >> the point is we know -- we know what the policy response already is by the ecb and the feds. so what is going to be the next catalyst to keep the markets to those new highs you're talking about? >> the next big catalyst is obviously the fiscal cliff resolution, second, you have spain sign on to oversight from the ecb. remove any possibility of spanish default and we think that lagarde is signaling that the conditions to that oversight will be a lot about labor market reforms. those are growth enhancing, so that's another great catalyst for the market. last, but certainly not least, i think you could see the new leadership team in china come more aggressive reform program than people are expecting. >> all right. michael, good to have you. >> thank you so much. >> michael jones of riverfront. >>
was a veteran of world war ii, he lost an arm charging machine gun nests in italy. that service earned him the medal of honor. he witnessed the bombing of pearl harbor as a high school student. daniel inouye, a hero pro provided great service over a long time. >>> a report will be delivered to congress as early as today. just ahead of congressional hearings this week, the report was ordered by secretary of state hillary clinton although she will not testify due to that illness. she had a concussion. she's recovering right now. the attack back in september in benghazi, killed four americans, including christopher stevens, the u.s. ambassador to libya. >>> it gives one man special insight into both aurora and the newtown shooting tragedies. his close connection to both events, coming up. concentrated broth to add delicious flavor to your skillet dish in just one stir. mmm! [ female announcer ] cook, meet compliments. get recipes at flavorboost.com. [ female announcer ] it's hard to see opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth ma
, italy. >>> i'm suzanne malveaux. a huge pro-labor rally outside the michigan state house. look. demonstrators protesting so-called right-to-work legislation that lawmakers are in the process of voting on. the house has already voted to approve the part of the law covering public employees. alison kosik outside the michigan state house in lansing. give us a sense of why this is so important to folks there. a huge demonstration. people who are angry on both sides. >> reporter: oh, yeah. unions are really at the fabric of so many people who live in michigan. it's why these protesters have come out today though the numbers, they got probably as high as a few thousand. the numbers have dwindled ever since that first vote came through. this means so much to the folks who live here in michigan because unions were practically born here. the united autoworkers union born here in 1935. 17 357b9% of the people who work in the state belong to unions. it's one of the top of the highest rates in the country. so to see the union undercut by the right-to-work legislation, that is being discuss
trayvon. >> this disaster developing off the coast in italy. >> the captain under house arrest. >> what would you like to say to that captain this morning? >> what a coward you are. >> 45 guilty counts. >> didn't you have a moral obligation? >> at the time, when i heard the word horseplay and asked if there was anything more than that, and the answer was no, i didn't think of anything more than that. >> there is no one else responsible. >> was there anything more you needed to hear from the prosecutors? >> i felt like the evidence just wasn't there. >> the cia director david petraeus, forced to resign. >> the explosive affair that's rocked washington. >> the woman at the heart of the investigation. >> let's do this. >> facebook will start trading under the simple f.b. >> you don't think the essence of the company is going to change at all? >> it's our job not to. >> what? >> the director and narrator of the viral senation "kony 2012" rampages and incoherent. >> banning him for life. saying there's no place in cycling for lance armstrong. ♪ and i >> off you go, whitney. off you go. >>
from florence italy to ft. lauderdale, florida, airbnb is looking for you. this online marketplace helps you rent a room or a house, and it is cheaper than most hotels. >> customers love it. some homeowners say it's helped them avoid foreclosure, but airbnb also had trouble with the law. we'll meet the founder and ceo. there he is. next on "cbs this morning." >> ♪ >>> airbnb is changing the travel business big time the same way that craigslist shook up classified ads. the website connects people who want to rent out a living space to travelers who need a place to stay. so, in just four years, airbnb has grown into one of the world's largest online marketplaces. co-founder and ceo, that would be brian chesky is here in studio 57. hello, brian chesky. >> hello. >> and congratulations to you. >> thank you. >> this is so cool. so, it's my understanding this company started, as many companies do with a personal issue for you that you were traveling to solve. >> yeah. i was living in san francisco with my roommate, joe, and we didn't have enough money for rent
] the charmed memories collection at kay jewelers. each charm is hand-crafted in italy, and with hundreds of charms to choose from, the possibilities are endless. turn your special moments into charmed memories. one more reason kay is the number one jewelry store in america. these are for me, right? ♪ every kiss begins with kay >> a mix of rain andn sleet then changing over to all rain. icy roads >>> natalie and willie, over to you. >>> thank you, maria. coming up are you being watched? why the mannequin you're checking out at the mall could keep an eye on you. >> that's creepy. >>> a rare look inside the queen's wardrobe from her ma s majesty's royal dresser. first, this is "today" on nb mine was earned off vietnam in 1968. over the south pacific in 1943. i got mine in iraq, 2003. usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection, and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans and their families is without equal. begin your legacy, get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. >
't affect the millionaires. they had to dial back. in france, of course, in all these countries and italy and other countries excise tax. they went in first. the cuts came after that, whatever meager cuts. that was growth of the growth off the growth. melissa: right. >> the lesson to be learned from europe isn't to be careful on cutting. it is to be careful on hike being, on hiking taxes. the beast is the government, in my opinion here. the beast is the government. you don't reward the beast by giving it more food, more dollars. that's what i near is going on here. melissa: yeah. lori: the president's desire to get rid of the debt ceiling limit at all, what kind of ramifications, what could happen? are we looking at another debt downgrade? a second downgrade could be really, really -- >> here is what i agree with him. this charade we go through every few months on the debt limit. republican presidents, democratic presidents, mark zandi from moody's it does damage our credibility. i agree to something like that. i didn't like fiat saying i will handle the debt thing. that would be like let
. and samsung withdrawal requests for injunctions against apple in germany, the netherlands, italy, france and the u.k. after a federal judge yesterday denies apple's request to ban sales of samsung's smart phone found to illegal use apple technology and instantgramm says it has the right to sell your photos without payment for notification and there is no way to opt out. move such to take effect on january 16th and the policy coming from three months after facebook completed its acquisition of the photo sharing sight. that is the latest from fox business giving you the power to prosper. ashley: budget talks in washington dominating headlines. our investors overlooking the bigger global threat than the fiscal cliff? joining us doug cote, chief market strategist withing investment management. always spending too much time worrying about the fiscal cliff and what worrres you on the global scale? >> fundamental you shouldn't focus too much on politicians anyway, what we are looking at is paying attention to the fundamentals of corporate earnings, what matters to companies and what we have see
as you have a drag on the economy. you have negative growth, a recession in spain and italy this year. you also have negative growth in greece. there's only so much you can have of negative growth across the continent of europe before impact spending patterns across the world. there are positives out there but we have to be focused on the fact that these problems are not going to go away. one of every four people in spain are unemployed and under the age of 25. fifty-six% to not have a job. that is a major rest of the for disaster and the math does not work. if you try to fix a problem with negative growth and nobody working. dennis: a lesson here. one last note on the fed. what is your concern there? >> pretty simple. the fed has raised the credit market. yield and price are not real. they are buying up trillions of dollars of these bonds and i'm worried about the day when the market no longer listens to them. the market has not been bigger than the fed over the last few years. of the market gets bigger than the fed, look out. yields should be much higher than where they are and if w
. it is not investing in itself. it is not doing things to create shareholder value. here is what italy's to, $2.7 billion fine. back of the envelope calculation in the last 10-q, that is 35% of the company's cash balance as of the last quarter. this has the potential to really impact the company. what happened to boil it down, a mexican company, kind of like the yellow pages of mexico, a website there, claiming breach of contract, lost profits. that is why the mexican court ruled as it did. it is expected that yahoo! is going to, you know, appeal this case but this is big bucks we're talking about here clearly. lori: investors are confident about that appeal because the stock is up 1 1/2%. >> there are a couple of reasons investors are sticking around. superstar celebrity, tech celebrity, marisa meyer, fifth ceo in a handful of years. they're willing to give her a shot. the company committed $3.6 billion to buying back stock. it already spent 212 million bucks just since marisa meyer said she would buy back the stock, the stock is up 20%. that is the real catalyst here. if we see the ruling sti
much better. you throw up the bund. many areas whether you talk italy or indeed greece, rates are moving down. that isn't a bad thing for funding but it does ehave peopl look at spain saying they'll do bank bailout, old program, not country bailout new program. the correction was small. goldman says stocks are the place to be. kind of making this trade a little more true than it was on its knee jerk. if you look at putting it together. you can see we're up several basis points. still not huge. if you open it up to a one-month chart, you can see that 160 remains the pivot. it's still about europe. don't despair. i'm sure the red herring of bashing tax policy in the u.s. will get to the front page before the end of the session. >> thank you very much. let's check out latest news in energy and medals with sharon epperson. >> it's the euro that we see in euro dollar helping commodities and risk on trade across the board in the sector. the fact that we are looking at that euro dollar and above 130 level is significant. also keep in mind that we did get improving factory activity. t
way or the other, we will. >> remember when we used to talk about spain? italy? >> the good old days. spain was borrowing at 7%. >> germany went to the five-year high. we could have that, too. unlike them, our economy is not in tatters. they go five-year high on tatters. audi, good car. >> yes. good car. >> meantime, shares of costco this morning up in the premarket. warehouse retailer earned 95 cents a share in the first fiscal quarter. revenue, profit margins beating forecasts helped by rising sales. those higher membership fees did hike fees a year ago november, which doesn't happen very often. the journal today says, model looks great. the business is great. the stock is just -- people want to pay a lot of money for it, jim. >> oh, yeah, costco, those are remarkable numbers. i know you did an excellent special on coastco and it seems like the execution was impressive. people want to go there. >> as gas prices come down, that helps them, given they make it a bit of a loss leader. valuation rich for your blood. >> when you go to buy a house, you see kirkland more than any other bra
in afghanistan, what happened that got you a call from the president when you were stationed in italy? >> my unit battle company, we were in a near ambush and there was 18 of us. everyone was doing everything they could. the majority of the shooting was done by all the people around me, which allowed me the freedom of movement. the taliban were trying to take a prisoner, soldier joshua brennan was shot several times and he was still alive and they were carrying him away. as i ran forward, i eliminated the threat and i grabbed sergeant brenner and brought him back to our line, as everyone else continued to fight. it's difficult for me to sit here alone because there are so many great people that are the reason why i'm here. i didn't look out for myself. they looked out for me. and two great men lost their lives that night. >> gretchen: what was it like for you to know that you had been bestowed this amazing honor that no living person has achieved since the vietnam war? >> it kind of hurt me at first. i read the stories about medal of honor recipients and they're heros, they're men that history bo
defending on when you get deployed. we were stationed in italy to families and seeing their children who weren't born yet are walking and talking. it's the family that really is the glue that holds it together. they are one of their parents and it's not that they don't want to be there, their business takes them elsewhere. >> throws everything off. here is to jen. thank you so much. congratulations on the book. >> thank you so much. >> colonel jack jacobs, thank you as well. >> it's good to be here. it's a must read and we look forward to getting up to west point. >> soon. we'll do it. >> all the best to you. new jersey governor chris christie heads to washington to ask for billions in aid as the economic toel reaches $40 billion in his state. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 let's talk about low-cost investing. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 at schwab, we're committed to offering you tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 low-cost investment options-- tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like our exchange traded funds, or etfs tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 which now have the lowest tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 operating expenses tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 in their
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 64 (some duplicates have been removed)